Dan Levy’s Again, This Time With Emmy-Successful Eyewear

“It is in all probability my favourite type of self expression,” Dan Levy says, “solely as a result of I have been form of compelled into it, whether or not I wished to or not.” By which Levy—a person who’s received Emmys as a author, director, and actor for his work on Schitt’s Creek—means…trend. Particularly, eyewear. He’s generally known as a lot for his appearing as he’s for his glasses and the multi-talented star’s eyewear model, D.L. Eyewear, simply launched its Spring Assortment.

This isn’t a brand new enterprise for Levy. Earlier than his present even aired, Levy had been engaged on D.L. Eyewear, beginning practically a decade in the past. Given all these Emmys, it received’t shock you to study that Levy was doing all of it on the specs aspect, from enterprise administration to social media to design. “It’s necessary that if you happen to’re going to place your title on it, that it comes instantly from the supply,” he says. Then Schitt’s Creek blew up, Levy acquired busy, and he needed to pause D.L. Eyewear—although the web site stayed up. And getting just a few orders. With the top of Schitt’s Creek, Levy’s again within the eyewear sport.

Dan Levy sporting the Highland glasses…

Courtesy of Sammy Rawal for DL Eyewear

…and the marginally funkier Walker sun shades.

Courtesy of Sammy Rawal for DL Eyewear

“It is actually about persevering with on with the philosophy that I began the corporate with, which was to make folks really feel good,” he says. Meaning versatility (each in kinds, but in addition prescriptions and elective blue-light blocking lenses) and affordability. “We wished to cost the frames at an inexpensive worth, one which could possibly be included within the well being care plan,” says Levy. Judging by the sell-outs and reactions, the plan’s working.

The Spring assortment is a mixture of basic shapes just like the Roxborough and extra fluid, of-the-moment kinds, just like the ’90s-tinged Walker and sharp angles of the cat-eye-shaped Harper. The Highland—initially designed as a one-off for an Emmy’s outfit—is possibly the model’s most wearable. Possibly not coincidentally, they’re the frames Dan wears probably the most. So even if you happen to aren’t (but) stashing Emmys by the armload in your mantle, you’ll at the least look the half.

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D.L. Eyewear “Highland” optical glasses in smoke

“I used to be carrying Thom Browne to the Emmys. As soon as we knew what we have been working with when it comes to the look, we constructed this body as a one-off for me to put on with the outfit. I cherished it a lot that we put it straight into manufacturing. So I really feel like this body has some good vibes round me.”

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D.L. Eyewear “Highland” sun shades in black

When the morning mild’s gleaming off your Emmy a bit too robust, give the shades model of Levy’s go-to frames a go. 

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D.L. Eyewear “Macpherson” sun shades in classic rose

“McPherson is a very nice plastic failsafe outsized, vintage-inspired sq. body. It jogs my memory of Italy. I photographed lots of people carrying this type of fashion and have undoubtedly temper boarded a number of previous Italian film stars. So that is our homage to them. It seems to be nice on a Vespa.”

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D.L. Eyewear “Roxborough” sun shades in camel

“That is based mostly on a classic sunglass that I purchased in Japan. There is a timelessness to it. It feels very very like previous Hollywood, which I feel is at all times an excellent look.”

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D.L. Eyewear “Walker” sun shades in blue stardust

“Walker is simply pure enjoyable. What we name the blue stardust has a sort of has a glitter in it, which is simply an effective way of dressing up a glance. You set them on and it is festive, particularly for the summer time. Stardust is my favourite, clearly.”

Product pictures by Matt Martin

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